>Felt Train Car

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The other day, Jay posted a photo of his dining room table, so I thought I’d show you the current state of mine:

Beaded Boston MBTA trolley train subway car T felted train bead embroidery pop art beading Pullman PCC

In the above photo, you’ll see all the materials required to make the felt foundation for a beaded Boston trolley car. There is lots of felt, Pellon interfacing, clear vinyl, scissors, a beading needle, nylon thread, a fabric pen, a tape measure, glue, my enlarged sketch, and a couple of circuit boards. After quite awhile, a few felt shapes emerged from that mess. They will be stitched to the underside of felt body of the train car.

Beaded Boston MBTA trolley train subway car T felted train bead embroidery pop art beading Pullman PCC

I’m trying to build up the body just a bit so that it appears dimensional. There are 5 felt layers so far, but I may add a few more eventually. The bottom layer will be the shadow beneath the train. I have also left room for the wheels, but I’m not sure what material I’ll use for those yet.

Beaded Boston MBTA trolley train subway car T felted train bead embroidery pop art beading Pullman PCC

Just like the real Green Line T, it’s taking awhile to leave the station. :0

9 thoughts on “>Felt Train Car

  1. >Hello fellow Bay Stater.Very interesting project – I have never seen anything like that. I did, however, recognize the T right off the bat! The green line is the one we use.

  2. >LOL. Actually, I have a smaller table for beading, but I use the dining room table for bigger tasks like assembling the fabric parts. If I need to eat and there’s stuff on the table, I just eat at my ‘puter! Where else? LOL.

  3. >It’s so interesting seeing how you start your work. Looking forward to seeing this one take shape.Re spam. You don’t want to try it. It’s repulsive. It’s full of fat and nasty recycled bits of pig. I think it came about in the war as it was cheap to produce and used up all the disgusting bits that were usually chucked out.Occasionally my mother used to try to get away with serving it when we were little, but even my father, who would eat anything, even tripe (!) used to push it around his plate and try to hide it beneath his knife and fork.Recently in a wave of nostalgia, spam has been re-introduced. Don’t touch it with a bargepole!

  4. >Thank you so much for sharing each step with us. It’s encouraging to know that step by step any of us could attempt these more involved projects even on a smaller scale. Your willingness to share may well bring out the bead artists of tomorrow.Arline

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